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Top 14 of 2014: How to move a 50-foot-wide superconducting electromagnet

December 19, 2014
Mike McEvoy, Aaron Epps, Mary Shenk and Professor Mike Eads stand in front of the Muon g-2 magnet during the July 26 move.

Mike McEvoy, Aaron Epps, Mary Shenk and Professor Mike Eads stand
in front of the Muon g-2 magnet during the July 26 move.

As 2014 draws to a close, NIU Today offers a look back at 14 of the top stories from the year.

No. 12

A high profile experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is already proving to be a boon for Northern Illinois University students in physics and engineering.

On Saturday, July 26, Fermilab moved a 50-foot-wide superconducting electromagnet across its campus to a newly constructed experimental building.

Made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire, the magnet is easily the largest component of a machine that will be used in the Muon g-2 experiment, involving scientists and engineers from 26 institutions around the world.

“Working on the Muon g-2 project from the ground up is valuable because it has broadened and strengthened my research skills,” says Mary Shenk of Rockford, who earned her master’s degree in physics this month and plans to go on for a Ph.D. “I now understand how much planning and preparation goes into a project of this size.”